Last edited by Shaktinris
Saturday, July 18, 2020 | History

3 edition of Mokṣa in Jainism, according to Umāsvāti found in the catalog.

Mokṣa in Jainism, according to Umāsvāti

by Robert J. Zydenbos

  • 388 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by Steiner in Wiesbaden .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Umāsvāti, -- ca. 135-ca. 219.,
  • Jainism

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Robert J. Zydenbos.
    SeriesBeiträge zur Südasienforschung -- Bd. 83
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBL1350 Z93 1983
    The Physical Object
    Paginationix, 81 p. --
    Number of Pages81
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19068732M
    ISBN 103515040536

    The issues in Jaina philosophy developed concurrently with those that emerged in Buddhist and Hindu philosophy. The period from the second century bc to about the tenth century ad evinces a tremendous interaction between the schools of thought and even an exchange of ideas, borne out especially in the rich commentary literature on the basic philosophical works of the respective systems. Jainism / ˈ dʒ eɪ n ɪ z əm / is an Indian religion that prescribes a path of non-violence towards all living philosophy and practice emphasize the necessity of self-effort to move the soul toward divine consciousness and soul that has conquered its own inner enemies and achieved the state of supreme being is called a jina ("conqueror" or "victor").

    Jainism (/ ˈ dʒ eɪ n ɪ z əm / or / ˈ dʒ aɪ n ɪ z əm /), traditionally known as Jain Dharma, is an ancient Indian religion belonging to the Śramaṇa tradition. The central tenet is non-violence and respect towards all living beings. The three main principles of Jainism are ahimsa ("non-violence"), anekantavada ("non-absolutism"), and aparigraha ("non-possessiveness"). Jainism: | | Jainism | | | ||| | Ja World Heritage Encyclopedia, the aggregation of the largest online encyclopedias available, and the most definitive collection.

    Moksha, also called vimoksha, vimukti and mukti, is a term in Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism for various forms of emancipation, enlightenment, liberation, and its soteriological and eschatological senses, it refers to freedom from saṃsāra, the cycle of death and its epistemological and psychological senses, moksha is freedom from ignorance: self-realization. Jainism and Prakrit in Ancient and Medieval India – essays for Prof. Jagdish Chandra Jain Karmic Bondage and Religious Change in Early Jainism with Special Reference to Umāsvāti and Kundakunda William J. Johnson Lala Sundar Lal Jain research series; volume 9 ‘Upayoga, according to Kundakunda and Umāsvāti’.


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Mokṣa in Jainism, according to Umāsvāti by Robert J. Zydenbos Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Umāsvāti, approximately approximately Mokṣa in Jainism, according to Umāsvāti. Wiesbaden: Steiner, Books. Mokṣa in Jainism, according to Umāsvāti (Steiner, ) The Calf Became an Orphan: A Study in Contemporary Kannada Fiction (Institut Français de Pondichéry, ) Jainism Today and Its Future (Manya, ) ReferencesBorn: Umaswati, also spelled as Umasvati and known as Umaswami, was an Indian scholar, possibly between 2nd-century and 5th-century CE, known for his foundational writings on Jainism.

He authored the Jain text Tattvartha Sutra (literally '"All That Is", also called Tattvarthadhigama Sutra). Umaswati's work was the first Sanskrit Mokṣa in Jainism text on Jain philosophy, and is the earliest extant Notable work(s): Tattvartha Sutra. Jainism (/ ˈ dʒ eɪ n ɪ z əm /), traditionally known as Jain Dharma, is an ancient Indian ers of Jainism are called "Jains", a word derived from the Prakrit word jina, meaning "victor".Jains trace their spiritual ideas and history through a succession of twenty-four leaders or tirthankaras, with the first being Rishabhanatha or also known as Adinath bhagwan, who according to.

The Jain Ontological Model according to Kundakunda and Umāsvāti Article (PDF Available) in Asian Studies 1(1):3 April with Reads How we measure 'reads'Author: Ana Bajželj. Harmless Souls: Karmic Bondage and Religious Change in Early Jainism with Special Reference to Umāsvāti and Kundakunda Volume 9 of Lala Sunder Lal Jain research series: Author: W.

Johnson: Publisher: Motilal Banarsidass Publ., ISBN: X, According to Umāsvāti book pages: Export Citation: BiBTeX EndNote RefMan/5(2). Zydenbos, R.J. () Mokṣa in Jainism According to Umāsvāti, Wiesbaden: Franz Steiner Verlag. (Deals with liberation, the subject of chapter 10 of Umāsvāti’s Tattvārthasūtra; includes text and translation, a commentary attributed to Umāsvāti and an introduction to the problem.).

The canonical texts of Jainism are called are said to be based on the discourse of the tirthankara, delivered in a samavasarana (divine preaching hall).

These discourses are termed as Śrutu Jnāna and comprises eleven angas and fourteen purvas. According to the Jains, the canonical literature originated from the first tirthankara Rishabhanatha. Jain philosophy is the oldest Indian philosophy that separates body (matter) from the soul (consciousness) completely.

Jain philosophy deals with reality, cosmology, epistemology (study of knowledge) and Vitalism. It attempts to explain the rationale of being and existence, the nature of the Universe and its constituents, the nature of soul's bondage with body and the means to achieve.

Jainism proposes a unique theory of reality in which the extreme positions of absolute identity and permanence on the one hand and absolute difference and change on the other are avoided in favour of integrative ontology. Here, identity and difference as well as permanence and change are coordinated.

The vertical and horizontal descriptions of the nature of reality are reflected in the basic. According to Jainism, the Ratnatraya or "three Gems", samyagdarśana (correct perception), samyagjñāna (right knowledge) and samyakchāritra (right conduct), together constitute the mokṣamarga or the path to liberation.

According to Acharya KundaKunda's Samayasara: Belief in the nine substances as they are is right faith (samyagdarśana). Ubhaya means something in Jainism, Prakrit, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page.

Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article. The text of the book is in separate files. Read this in the e-Library. Jain Spirit This is issue 1 of Jain Spirit, covering July to September Jain Spirit: Advancing Jainism into the Future was a magazine published in the UK for an international audience, primarily of Jains, from.

According to the Jains there were originally two kinds of sacred books, the fourteen Pūrvas and the eleven Aṅgas. The Pūrvas continued to be transmitted for some time but were gradually lost. The works known as the eleven Aṅgas are now the oldest parts of the existing Jain canon.

The names of these are. Acāra, Sūtrakṛta, Sthāna. Karma is the basic principle within an overarching psycho-cosmology in moral actions form the basis of the transmigration of the soul ().The soul is constrained to a cycle of rebirth, trapped within the temporal world (), until it finally achieves liberation ().Liberation is achieved by following a.

Jainism and Buddhism Book of Abstracts to consider that the word form poṣadha have attained the most general currency. By investigating about sixty kinds of Śrāvakācāra texts, it can be said that the word form proṣadha has attained the most currency.

Furthermore, we can precisely point out the tendency according to the sect. That is to. Jainism (/ ˈ dʒ eɪ n ɪ z əm /), traditionally known as Jain Dharma, is an ancient Indian ers of Jainism are called "Jains", a word derived from the Prakrit word jina, meaning "victor".Jains trace their spiritual ideas and history through a succession of twenty-four leaders or tirthankaras, with the first being Rishabhanatha or also known as Adinath bhagwan, who according.

Mokṣa (मोक्ष) refers to an aspect of nṛsiṃha (‘man-lion’), according to the Vihagendra-saṃhitāwhich mentions seventy-four forms (inlcuding twenty forms of vyūha).

He is also known as Mokṣanṛsiṃha or Mokṣanarasiṃha. Nṛsiṃha is a Tantric deity and refers to the furious (ugra) incarnation of Viṣṇu. Moving towards liberation.

As one of the principal concepts in the Jain faith, liberation – mokṣa – needs to be considered alongside the closely related concepts of the soul, karma and rebirth.

The soul or self – jīva – in Jainism can be thought of consciousness or sentience. It is found in all living beings, and those objects that are not alive are ajīva – without consciousness. Jain philosophy (Sanskrit: "Jain darsana"; _sa. जैन दर्शन) deals extensively with the problems of metaphysics, reality, cosmology, ontology, epistemology and divinity.

Jainism is essentially a transtheistic religion of ancient India. [Zimmer (), p] It is a continuation of the ancient IAST|Śramaṇa tradition which co-existed with the Vedic tradition since ancient times. Jainism does not support belief in a creator ing to Jain doctrine, the universe and its constituents—soul, matter, space, time, and principles of motion—have always existed.

All the constituents and actions are governed by universal natural is not possible to create matter out of nothing and hence the sum total of matter in the universe remains the same (similar to law.In Jainism, moksha is the highest and the noblest objective that a soul should strive to achieve.

In fact, it is the only objective that a person should have; other objectives are contrary to the true nature of soul. With the right view, knowledge and efforts all souls can attain this state.The concept of continuous rebirth is one of the principal Jain hold that a soul exists within one physical body, dies and is then born into a different body in a different life, with this process repeating.

This continues for eternity or until the soul is free of all karma. The liberation of the soul from the cycle of rebirth – mokṣa – is the ultimate aim of Jainism.